Monday, 11 January 2016

Usury is Prohibited in the New Testament by Jesus Himself

 For if ye love them which love you, what thank have ye? for sinners also love those that love them. And if ye do good to them which do good to you, what thank have ye? for sinners also do even the same. And if ye lend to them of whom ye hope to receive, what thank have ye? for sinners also lend to sinners, to receive as much again. But love ye your enemies, and do good, and lend, hoping for nothing again; and your reward shall be great, and ye shall be the children of the Highest: for he is kind unto the unthankful and to the evil.
Be ye therefore merciful, as your Father also is merciful (Luke 6:32-36).

Usury is prohibited, not permitted by the New Testament. When Jesus came, He did not abolish the Law but fulfilled it (Matthew 5:17-20). This includes all the Moral Law of God from the Old Testament including the moral prohibition on usury.

When Jesus was speaking in Luke 6:32-36, He was proclaiming by asking rhetorical questions, what does it mean to be righteous, that is, to obey the Law of God. In Luke 6:34, He said: "And if ye lend to them of whom ye hope to receive, what thank have ye? for sinners also lend to sinners, to receive as much again." What this means is that simply because one does not ask back for more than what another has borrowed does not mean that one is righteous. This implies that usury is beyond question as to whether it is righteous. It is a sin under the New Covenant as much as it was sin under the Old Covenant.